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Thought you might like to see this… March 6, 2009

Posted by Marco in Angry Robot.
1 comment so far

greyred_on_black_10cm_72dpiRather a smart little thing. We’ve had it for a little while, actually, but now’s a good time to show it off.

Also worth showing off: our new website will be up on Monday. It includes details of our first releases and how you can sign-up for our robot army. Busy people, us.

The real reason Angry Robot employed me. February 6, 2009

Posted by Lee in Angry Robot.
2 comments

 

LeeBot

Hell – you use any advantage you’ve got!

What is “genre-enough”? January 28, 2009

Posted by Lee in Angry Robot, Submissions.
9 comments

spacesquids1I stated in my previous post (“So, Uhhhh…  Hi”, below) that we had recently rejected some manuscripts that were not “genre enough”, and received a question back “what does the angry robot think is ‘genre enough’?”.

A thoroughly deserving question.

There are many criteria we use when deciding whether a book is suitable for Angry Robot (a major one being, of course: did we enjoy reading it? – it’s often such a subjective game). The question of whether a book is “genre enough” is an important one.

I can’t go into details about the rejected books themselves, as the authors will still be seeking suitable publishers, so I’ll talk in general terms.

Let’s look at the Bond movies. They’re usually reviewed in SF magazines and forums as they tend to contain gadgets that don’t exist, yet – an invisible car, a jet-pack that actually works, etc. There is an argument to say that these are science fiction films. I’d argue against that, and say that while they contain future-technology, the films are straighforward spy thrillers/action movies. The SF elements don’t actually matter to the plot – they’re just there to make the viewer think they’re watching something cool. Remove the invisible car or remote-control helicopter, and the film is still intact.

If you can remove the genre element without harming the flow of the narrative, it’s probably not genre enough.

For a book to be considered suitable it must not only wear its genre credentials on its sleeve, but probably on its underwear, too. It may even be tattooed on its buttock.

If your main character happens to live in a haunted house, and enjoys regular conversations with the ghost that’s based there, that’s a supernatual element. However, if the ghostly conversations add nothing to the plot (eg. if the ghost could be switched with a mundane, human flatmate, or simply removed completely without disrupting the plot), then the story is not genre enough. The fantastical elements of the story must not simply be a painted canvas against which the rest of the story takes place, they must be integral and vital to the tale being told.

Similarly, if your book is about the break-up of a long-term relationship, and your protagonist just happens to be a werewolf, that’s probably not enough to make it “genre enough”. Why is it important that he’s a werewolf (it’s important to him, obviously)? Is is lupine nature critical to the story being told, or is it merely a detail added to make the character more interesting?

The other answer, of course, is similar to the classic response to the question “what is science fiction?”

What is genre enough? We can’t give you a 100% complete answer, but we know it when we see it.

Xmas opening hours December 22, 2008

Posted by Marco in Angry Robot.
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Our remote snowbound outpost will be unmanned between Weds Dec 24th and Monday Jan 5th. However, we’ll be picking up and replying to email sporadically, so feel free to drop us a line if you need us.

When we return, we will have details of our first season for you. Oh yes.

Happy holidays, flesh-covered lifeforms.

All we want for Xmas is world domination December 18, 2008

Posted by Marco in Angry Robot, Kill Em All!.
2 comments

Angry so angry